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Wearable Hadoop technology

While Hadoop and MapReduce have been harping on distributed parallel processing on community hardware for long, some Hadoop enthusiasts have taken this too far. Enter Datasayer from Edward J Yoon who has built wearable Hadoop technology. This means every time you walk, jump, blink your eyes or move your hand, you would be using your kinetic energy to run a MapReduce job.

Read below to understand this breathtaking innovation.




  • Hadoop Glass– Inspired by Google glass, this forms the client layer of your Hadoop cluster. Using the eye wear interface, you can trigger a MapReduce job or fire a Pig, Hive or Hama query.
  • Hadoop Watch– Inspired by Samsung Gear (Watch) technology, this forms the name node of your Hadoop cluster and stores the meta data for the data stored in data nodes. Further, the job tracker is also hosted on the watch itself and using MRv1, controls the execution of tasks on different nodes.

  • Hadoop Shoes– This forms the data nodes layer of the cluster. By default the replication factor is 2 for each block resident in data node shoe. Each time you walk or jump, the kinetic energy is converted to CPU cycles and powers the tasks running via tasktracker on each shoe.

  • Hadoop Kinect- Inspired by Microsoft’s Kinect technology, you can configure the shoes a.k.a data nodes of another person in vicinity of 100 meters. The architecture also leverages advanced wireless technology to communicate between nodes. From a scalability perspective, all you need to do is have more people jumping or walking with data node shoes in the vicinity.


If all this sounds too good to be true, well, you guessed it right. This is an All Fools Day prank by Datasayer. 

Follow @datasayer

Comments

  1. Way to go Edward....

    ReplyDelete
  2. Wearable Hardtop technology is taking the best technological environment which will be very essential to me as well and sure the content will be very important to me as well.
    Best Tech News

    ReplyDelete

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